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Not in Our School Videos

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  • This is the winning video for the United Sikhs and Not In Our School Anti-Bullying Video Contest. This video shares the story of Sahib, a Sikh youth who encountered bullying in Stockton, CA. Sahib turns to his Sikh community to get the courage to stand up and speak out against bullying and intolerance.
  • Students take time to reflect on how Not in Our School and Not in Our Town programs affected them. They discuss stereotyping, bullying, and their own experiences with intolerance.
  • Each year, Facing History teacher Jane Wooster asks the students in her classes to take on a "social action" project of their own choosing. This year, several of the students have chosen to conduct a lunch-time demonstration to draw attention to the use of the word "illegal" to describe undocumented immigrants, and start a school-wide conversation about the way immigrants are perceived in their community.
  • At Orange High School in Pepper Pike, Ohio, students are mapping their school to locate the spaces where bullying takes place. After identifying the "bully hotspots," including the cafeteria, media lab, and locker rooms, students created a flash freeze demonstration to raise awareness about bullying, and opened the conversation about how to create a safer school.
  • When Facing History teachers Jamie Lott and Mary Sok asked their World Cultures class about bullying at their school, the class described the hallways as safe. But after listening to a presentation given by hate crimes task force officer Dave D'Amico, they started a discussion about the widespread problem of online bullying, and how they as a class could take the first steps toward preventing it.
  • High school football captains join their community in taking a Not In Our Town pledge to stand up to bullying and hate.
  • Joe Lobozzo's class at Lakewood High School discuss the trailer of Light in the Darkness.
  • When Facing History teachers Jamie Lott and Mary Sok asked their World Cultures class about bullying at their school, the class described the hallways as safe. But after listening to a presentation given by hate crimes task force officer Dave D'Amico, they started a discussion about the widespread problem of online bullying, and how they as a class could take the first steps toward preventing it.
  • From SpeakingInTonguesFilm.info: Sometimes a small idea has big implications. Consider America’s resolute commitment to remaining an “English only” nation. It turns out that our attitudes about language reflect much bigger concerns: that language is a metaphor for the barriers that come between neighbors, be they across the street or around the world.
  • As Indiana University students celebrate the holiday season, the sense of calm is shattered by a series of attacks against Jewish institutions. Bloomington United, a community group created in 1998 after a white supremacist spread hate and murder on campus, reaches out to IU students and helps heal new wounds.
  • Janet Miller, a teacher at Hoover Middle School, was blown away by district-wide statistics that revealed the risk of violence that transgendered youth experience. Moved by the statistics, Miller stated to her colleagues that it was their responsibility to create a safe learning environment for ALL students and that any type of discrimination should not be tolerated.
  • "Identity safe classrooms are those in which teachers strive to ensure students that their social identities are an asset rather than a barrier to success in the classroom. Acknowledging students' identities, rather than trying to be colorblind, can build the foundation for strong positive relationships. This, coupled with challenging opportunities to learn, can help all students begin to feel they are welcomed, supported, and valued as members of the learning community." —Dr. Dorothy Steele Learn more about identity safety in this interview of Dr. Dorothy Steele, co-author with Dr. Becki Cohn-Vargas of the new book for elementary educators, "Identity Safe Classrooms: Places to Belong and Learn."
  • Not In Our Town: Class Actions profiles students and community members who are creating change in the wake of racism, anti-Semitism, and the traumatic consequences of bullying. Narrated by Survivor winner Yul Kwon, the half-hour documentary will debut on PBS stations in 2012.
  • Four short films about communities today reaching for Dr. King's dream
  • This public service announcement encourages students to be an upstander. Created by high school students from American University's Discover the World of Communication Summer Program held at University of California Berkeley during the Summer of 2011.
  • After a rash of bias-motivated incidents and hate crimes at the University of San Diego, faculty, staff and student leaders have been grappling with how to respond.
  • In 1995, Azim Khamisa's 20-year-old son, Tariq, was delivering a pizza when he was shot to death by a 14-year-old gang member. Experiencing the pain, grief, frustration, and anger that a parent would, Azim decided that the only way he could better the situation was to use the tool of FORGIVE to ensure that this type of tragedy happens less frequently in the future.
  • Students at Watchung Hills Regional High School in New Jersey were fascinated when they heard about an Orange Out Against Bullying in Marshalltown, Iowa. When they got together, they decided to create their own "White-Out to Erase Bullying" event. The campaign took on the flavor of their community. Even the weather cooperated, blanketing the town with snow as high school leaders tied white ribbons on snow-laden trees and students led activities pledging not to be silent in the face of bullying at their high schools, middle schools and elementary schools. Even the mayor and city council members joined the effort.
  • This is the winning video for the United Sikhs and Not In Our School Anti-Bullying Video Contest. This video shares the story of Sahib, a Sikh youth who encountered bullying in Stockton, CA. Sahib turns to his Sikh community to get the courage to stand up and speak out against bullying and intolerance.
  • After being bullied for his small size and pitch of his voice, DeMonte Smith decided to join Safe School Ambassadors at his middle school to reduce the amount of bullying he saw at his school.
  • The packed gymnasium erupted on a Tuesday night with applause as the Oakland High School varsity boys basketball team ran onto the court for the first home game of the season. The “No H8” basketball game was created by the students to honor Sasha Fleischman, a high school senior at nearby Maybeck High School in Berkeley, CA, who was badly burned after being set on fire while sleeping on a city bus, and to remind the local community that Oakland High is a school where diversity is celebrated and students stand up to injustice. This event is just one part of an ongoing Not In Our School campaign by Oakland High School.
  • Students and teachers react to their story on screen.
  • The students of Newcomers High, a school for newly arrived immigrants, reached out to Joselo Lucero with letters of sympathy when his brother Marcelo was killed in 2008. Two years later, Joselo visits the school to speak to the students about what he learned from the loss of his brother, his experiences as an immigrant, and the difficult process of forgiveness.
  • The son of Filipino immigrants, Laurence Tan was studying to be a doctor when the vision of becoming a teacher presented itself in a dream. Now a fifth-grade teacher in Watts, California, Laurence uses the tool of TEACH to inspire and educate students in an area where opportunities are slim.
  • When the Kansas hate group known as the Westboro Baptist Church (Fred Phelps' family) announced they would picket Bay Area schools and Jewish institutions, students at Gunn High School decided they could not sit quietly. (3 min 34 sec) Check out our Local Lesson, Helping High Schoolers Take the Lead, which features an interview with Gunn High School Principal Noreen Likins.
  • Lakewood, OH high school students use video to talk about race.
  • Art students at Patchogue-Medford High School wanted to do something ...
  • As a high school student, Alana Garrett mentored fourth grade students and taught them how to prevent and stand up against bullying as part of a Not In Our School project. In this 2009 video she also shares her story of going from a person who was bullied to an anti-bullying activist and leader. Alana is now studying sociology at Baldwin Wallace University and is a community organizer for the Children's Defense Fund where she is working to stop violence among youth in inner city Cleveland.