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Not in Our School Videos

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  • Abbott Middle School students filmed and acted out a skit about bullying, in San Mateo, CA.
  • Here is an example of a student-led assembly at Peralta Elementary School in Oakland, CA. This assembly launched their schoolwide anti-bullying campaign. The students did a skit and talked about how to be an upstander as they took the lead in addressing bullying and intolerance. Students also learned how to be upstanders who work toward an accepting and identity safe school environment. Not In Our School developed a guide and sample skit for a similar assembly at the middle and high school levels. Learn more at niot.org
  • Student leaders from Del Sur Middle School in Lancaster, California visit a local elementary school and teach 4th and 5th grade students how to be upstanders. Through role-playing and interactive activities led by the middle schoolers, the younger students learn the meaning of the term "upstander" and how to effectively intervene, get help and support a peer who is being bullied. This process can be an effective tool to use with students in your own classroom and school. Please use the guidelines below and review the "Note of Caution" to ensure a positive and productive experience.
  • "Identity safe classrooms are those in which teachers strive to ensure students that their social identities are an asset rather than a barrier to success in the classroom. Acknowledging students' identities, rather than trying to be colorblind, can build the foundation for strong positive relationships. This, coupled with challenging opportunities to learn, can help all students begin to feel they are welcomed, supported, and valued as members of the learning community." —Dr. Dorothy Steele Learn more about identity safety in this interview of Dr. Dorothy Steele, co-author with Dr. Becki Cohn-Vargas of the new book for elementary educators, "Identity Safe Classrooms: Places to Belong and Learn."
  • After intermediate students share personal experiences, they decide to take action and invent the "Leaving a Positive Footprint" activity, where the pupils paint blue footprints with positive messages "walking" though their campus. Later, they work with first grade buddies to discuss bullying and speaking up, and together they make paper footprint cut-outs and create their own upstander messages to post around the school.
  • Inspiring voices from the Not In Our Town Movement and why they care
  • San Francisco students find a creative response to hate.
  • When Facing History teachers Jamie Lott and Mary Sok asked their World Cultures class about bullying at their school, the class described the hallways as safe. But after listening to a presentation given by hate crimes task force officer Dave D'Amico, they started a discussion about the widespread problem of online bullying, and how they as a class could take the first steps toward preventing it.
  • Vajra Watson founded SAYS: Sacramento Area Youth Speaks to give young people a voice through hip hop and spoken word. "We underestimate young people," Vajra says. "They're ready to grab the mic. Are we ready to listen?"
  • Gunn High School students challenge the use of the derogatory saying.
  • Olympia students speak out when Neo-Nazis organize in their town.
  • Stand Up, Stand Out: No Checking, No Capping, No Bullying highlights one middle school’s response to a noticeable increase in “checking,” or the practice of exchanging verbal insults between students. This video highlights the next steps Fairview Middle School took in order to curb the practice of “checking,” stop any opportunity to bully, and ultimately create a safer school for all students and community members.
  • When teacher Janet Miller learned that transgender youth in her district were the most at risk of attempting suicide, she wanted to make sure that her students felt safe. After sharing the alarming statistics with the school community, teachers and students worked together to create a Gay Straight Alliance at Hoover Middle School in the San Francisco Unified School District. The GSA brings students together to talk about differences and acceptance.
  • Patchogue, NY after the murder of Ecuadorian immigrant Marcelo Lucero
  • In the heart of the South, students at the University of Mississippi question whether traditions tied to the Confederacy and segregation continue to belong on their campus. When a chant and football fight song surface old racial tensions and divide the Ole Miss community, student leaders, supported by their chancellor, bring people together. This is the first segment in the PBS special, "Not In Our Town: Class Actions," which premiered nationally in Feb. 2012. For more information, visit http://www.niot.org/classactions.
  • Dr. Joseph Marshall, Jr. is an author, activist, and veteran street soldier. Founder of the anti-violence movement Alive & Free, Marshall draws audiences from across the country to his weekly radio program, Street Soldiers— a name Dr. Marshall uses to describe people working to eliminate violence in their communities. To help keep his own community safer, Dr. Marshall co-founded the Omega Boys Club after years of working as a middle school teacher and seeing too many of his students lost to drugs and violence.
  • Students at Watchung Hills Regional High School in New Jersey were fascinated when they heard about an Orange Out Against Bullying in Marshalltown, Iowa. When they got together, they decided to create their own "White-Out to Erase Bullying" event. The campaign took on the flavor of their community. Even the weather cooperated, blanketing the town with snow as high school leaders tied white ribbons on snow-laden trees and students led activities pledging not to be silent in the face of bullying at their high schools, middle schools and elementary schools. Even the mayor and city council members joined the effort.
  • Gunn High School students transcend the hurt of stereotypes.
  • Student leaders from Del Sur Middle School in Lancaster, California visit a local elementary school and teach 4th and 5th grade students how to be upstanders. Through role-playing and interactive activities led by the middle schoolers, the younger students learn the meaning of the term "upstander" and how to effectively intervene, get help and support a peer who is being bullied. This process can be an effective tool to use with students in your own classroom and school. Please use the guidelines below and review the "Note of Caution" to ensure a positive and productive experience.
  • Gunn High School students challenge the use of the derogatory saying.
  • Olympia students speak out when Neo-Nazis organize in their town.
  • Here is an example of a student-led assembly at Peralta Elementary School in Oakland, CA. This assembly launched their schoolwide anti-bullying campaign. The students did a skit and talked about how to be an upstander as they took the lead in addressing bullying and intolerance. Students also learned how to be upstanders who work toward an accepting and identity safe school environment. Not In Our School developed a guide and sample skit for a similar assembly at the middle and high school levels. Learn more at niot.org