Preventative Strategies | Page 2 | Not in Our Town

Preventative Strategies

  Student leaders from Del Sur Middle School in Lancaster, California visit a local elementary school and teach 4th and 5th grade students how to be upstanders. Through role-playing and interactive activities led by the middle schoolers, the younger students learn the meaning of the term "upstander" and how to effectively intervene, get help and support a peer who is being bullied. This process can be an effective tool to use with students in your own classroom and school.   This film is a great way to spark discussion as part of a schoolwide campaign. Click here to get the Not In Our School Anti-Bullying Campaign Quick Start Guide.   Closed captioning available for this film. To turn on closed captioning, hit play and go to the bottom right-hand corner and click "CC."   Subtítulos están disponibles en español. Para utilizarlos, haga clic en "CC" ubicada en la parte inferior del video.   
Additional Writing Activities for Not In Our School Films and the Video Action Kit NIOS films and lesson plans can be used in academic courses that address writing and health. Here are some activities that can be added to address Common Core State Standards in areas of Writing and Critical Thinking. 1. Vocabulary: Select key words (e.g., stereotype, bullying, hate) seek dictionary definitions observe how the words are used in context of the film       analyze the impact of specific word choices 2. Select a pre-viewing or post-viewing question. Seek additional information from primary and secondary sources. Write a persuasive essay. Support claims with relevant evidence. 3. Select a film topic (e.g., bullying, prejudice, hate crimes, Islam, immigration, sexual orientation) and do additional research. Synthesize the new information with information in the film. Write a research report on the topic.
  "Identity safe classrooms are those in which teachers strive to ensure students that their social identities are an asset rather than a barrier to success in the classroom. Acknowledging students' identities, rather than trying to be colorblind, can build the foundation for strong positive relationships. This, coupled with challenging opportunities to learn, can help all students begin to feel they are welcomed, supported, and valued as members of the learning community." —Dr. Dorothy Steele Learn more about identity safety in this interview of Dr. Dorothy Steele, co-author with Dr. Becki Cohn-Vargas (Not In Our School director) of the new book for elementary educators, "Identity Safe Classrooms: Places to Belong and Learn."    
  Dr. Joseph Marshall, Jr. is an author, activist, and veteran street soldier. Founder of the anti-violence movement Alive & Free, Marshall draws audiences from across the country to his weekly radio program, Street Soldiers— a name Dr. Marshall uses to describe people working to eliminate violence in their communities. To help keep his own community safer, Dr. Marshall co-founded the Omega Boys Club after years of working as a middle school teacher and seeing too many of his students lost to drugs and violence. This video is part of a series produced by Not In Our School’s parent company, The Working Group, for the Institute for Advancing Unity. This series focus on extraordinary people whose personal choices have inspired others to join in tremendous collective achievements.  To turn on closed captioning for this film, first hit play and then go to the bottom right-hand corner and click: "CC"   Get the Quick Start Guide to start a Not In Our School Campaign in your school   Series Executive Producer: Edith Crawford Concept Designer: Stephanie Francis CEO, Institute for Advancing Unity: Dr. Robert M. Harris, Ph.D.  
  The son of Filipino immigrants, Laurence Tan was studying to be a doctor when the vision of becoming a teacher presented itself in a dream. Now a fifth-grade teacher in Watts, California, Laurence uses the tool of TEACH to inspire and educate students in an area where opportunities are slim. Laurence has also helped establish the Watts Youth Collective with former students, an organization that promotes social change through media. Laurence’s 12-hour teaching days and his work with the collective are efforts to produce positive changes in each individual and the community. This video is part of a series produced by Not In Our School’s parent company, The Working Group, for the Institute for Advancing Unity. This series focus on extraordinary people whose personal choices have inspired others to join in tremendous collective achievements.    To turn on closed captioning for this film, first hit play and then go to the bottom right-hand corner and click: "CC"   Get the Quick Start Guide to start a Not In Our School Campaign in your school Series Executive Producer: Edith Crawford Concept Designer: Stephanie Francis CEO, Institute for Advancing Unity: Dr. Robert M. Harris, Ph.D. 
  As a former pro football player, Brian Cox understands the value of teamwork and community in achieving a goal. After retiring from the NFL, Cox came back to his native Los Angeles, witnessing the destruction that gang violence had wrought on his old neighborhood. As an administrator for the Parks Department, Cox became the director of the South Park Recreation Center and began efforts to improve the park. Through the common bond of football and community, Cox and his supporters led a campaign to improve the park to create a safe space for youth to gather and practice sports. Eventually gaining the trust of the community, Cox has transformed the park from a gang hangout to a vibrant family destination, improving the surrounding neighborhood at the same time. This video is part of a series produced by Not In Our School’s parent company, The Working Group, for the Institute for Advancing Unity. This series focus on extraordinary people whose personal choices have inspired others to join in tremendous collective achievements.    To turn on closed captioning for this film, first hit play and then go to the bottom right-hand corner and click: "CC"   Get the Quick Start Guide to start a Not In Our School Campaign in your school
  At age 12, Aitan Grossman was inspired by "An Inconvenient Truth" and began a journey that led him to use music to advocate for the preservation of the natural landscape around him.   This video is part of a series produced by Not In Our School's parent company, The Working Group, for the Institute for Advancing Unity. This series focus on extraordinary people whose personal choices have inspired others to join in tremendous collective achievements.   To turn on closed captioning for this film, first hit play and then go to the bottom right-hand corner and click: "CC"   Get the Quick Start Guide to start a Not In Our School Campaign in your school