Video Category: Racism | Page 2 | Not in Our Town

Video Category: Racism

"Moving forward, we have to continue to connect with our allies, with all the community groups that came out here." -- 2012 Silent March Protester Driven by a genuine urge to end racial profiling by denouncing NYPD's Stop and Frisk policy, thousands upon thousands of New Yorkers came together this Father's Day in a powerful silent march through the streets of New York. Primarily organized by the NAACP, the march conveyed the discrimination and desire to maintain dignity felt by not just those who had been stopped and frisked before, but community members in general, particularly in consideration of the recent murder of Trayvon Martin.   Read more about the Silent March here.    
  A bi-racial couple in Montgomery, West Virginia, was targeted and brutally beaten by local police officers. Twan and Lauren Reynolds, supported by the federal government and a private attorney stood up to the injustice and racism they faced. Their motivation? To protect the town they love from hate-based violence, no matter the source.
This promo features scenes from an upcoming PBS special about three stories of students and their communities standing together to stop hate and bullying.
Librarian assistant Gilda Ramos became a translator for the Lucero family who came to Patchogue from Gualaceo, Ecuador as the community gathered to honor Marcelo Lucero. Ramos also translated for Latino residents at community events and meetings that were held at the library, the Patchogue Theatre, vigils and rallies. Like libraries across the country, the Patchogue-Medford Library is a place where people come together and feel supported and safe.
"We are all Americans in this country." —Fred Korematsu (1919-2005) Fred Korematsu's fight for equality became a symbol of American freedom. Born in the U.S., Korematsu protested the forced internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II, claiming it was unconstitutional. The U.S. Supreme Court upheld charges against him in 1944 and it would take nearly 40 years for his charges to be formally overturned. Korematsu said, "It was a great victory for all Americans and all Asians in this country, that this will never happen again." In 2011, California celebrated its first Fred Korematsu Day of Civil Liberties and the Constitution on Jan. 30. It is the first day named after an Asian-American in the history of the United States. Five hundred teachers in California teach Korematsu's story on that day. “In the long history of our country’s constant search for justice, some names of ordinary citizens stand for millions of souls: Plessy, Brown, Parks. To that distinguished list, today we add the name of Fred Korematsu,” said President Bill Clinton when he presented Korematsu with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian award, in 1998.
Every January, Not In Our Town honors Dr. Martin Luther King’s legacy by sharing the real life stories of people who are applying Dr. King’s principles today. Though the political landscape has changed since the Civil Rights era, his dream that the United States would fulfill its promise of equality has yet to become reality. But Dr. King’s work proves that change is indeed possible in this country. The communities in Embracing the Dream: Lessons from the Not In Our Town Movement are living proof of that — town by town, school by school, they demonstrate that change is happening. Watch their stories below. What will you do this Martin Luther King Jr. Day - Monday, January 21 - to Embrace the Dream?
After being set on fire, 15-year old Southern Missouri teen seeks justice. (5:22)
Joselo talks about what it means to remember his brother and go to the trial everyday. Since the killing of his brother, Marcelo, in November of 2008, Joselo Lucero has worked to share his brothers story and raise awareness about anti-immigrant violence. Now one of the seven teens charged in the killing is standing trial, and Joselo will be attending court every day until a verdict is reached.  Send a message of support to Joselo and his family in the comments section below.
WHO CARES about standing up to hate and intolerance?  Tell us why you care: join our new video campaign by posting a video response on our YouTube page.
Since the killing of his brother, Marcelo, in November of 2008, Joselo Lucero has worked tirelessly to share his brother's story and raise awareness about anti-immigrant violence. Now one of the seven teens charged in the killing is standing trial, and Joselo will be attending court every day until a verdict is reached. Send a message of support to Joselo and his family in the comments section below.