hate crime response | Not in Our Town

hate crime response

  Alexandra Lee-Jobe is a longtime social activist and educator in Davis, CA. An active member of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Davis, Alex has led the organization's Anti-Racism Task Team and worked tirelessly to initiate and improve diversity and inclusion in her community. Recently Alex has become a founding member of the Davis Phoenix Coalition, a member of the Not In Our Town Network. This group is working on creating an inclusive community center servicing the diverse Davis community. Tell us about your community. Davis is a small city with a population of 66,000 residents and 33,000 college students. The University of California, Davis is the largest employer of 28,000. It's a bike-friendly city with a well-respected school system and a "liberal" community. It is also known as the second most educated city in the U.S. I went to college here, in 1972-73, receiving a B.S. in Applied Behavioral Science.
Our hearts and thoughts are with the community of Oak Creek, Wisconsin today, after yesterday's tragic shooting at a Sikh temple that claimed seven lives—including the gunman—and left three wounded. The Sikh community has been a target of hate since the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks and often mistaken for Muslim. Yesterday's tragedy reminds us of the two Sikh grandfathers who were shot during their daily stroll in Elk Grove, Calif. in March 2011. We joined the community seven days after the shootings and documented their interfaith vigil, and again, for the community's Sikh Solidarity Day, detailed below. This piece is an example of community solidarity with the Sikh community and law enforcement leadership.  One of the community leaders in Elk Grove was Amar Shergill, a West Sacramento attorney who is a board member of that city's Sikh temple and the American Sikh Political Action Committee. He spoke about Oak Creek, Wisconisin's tragedy with the local Patch. 
 Photo source: Concord, NH Police Department. While racist graffiti scribbled on the homes of three Concord families was meant to hurt and intimidate the refugee population of New Hampshire’s capital city, residents united immediately in an ongoing effort to show that everyone is welcome and safe in their community.    The hate messages were discovered on Sept. 18 and targeted refugee families who are originally from Africa. The incident has been labeled a hate crime by police and is being investigated by the New Hampshire attorney general’s office, according to the Boston Globe.   
Patchogue, NY: In the wake of the murder of Marcelo Lucero and other anti-immigrant violence on Long Island, many community members are using the arts and media to spread messages of hope and unity. Others are using faith-based means to discuss difference, examine questions around immigration, and build inclusive communities. November 8 marks the one year anniversary of the hate crime killing of Marcelo Lucero in Patchogue, NY.  The family of Marcelo Lucero and the people of Patchogue and Suffolk County, NY are planning a series of events. Next Saturday Nov. 7th a Community Vigil will be held at the site where Marcelo Lucero was brutally slain on Nov. 8, 2008. Marcelo's family will be present. Participants have been asked to wear white t-shirts.
Lessons from Olympia, Washington
Lessons from Billings, Montana