Bullying | Page 5 | Not in Our Town

Bullying

Each school’s anti-bullying efforts contribute new and exciting ideas to share with others. Read how Abbott Middle School in San Mateo, CA has created a Campus Climate Committee with a range of exciting and interactive activities. As part of this work, Abbott teachers have also made a “promise” to support their students. Abbott has embarked upon a spirited campaign to decrease bullying, and more to the point, create a community of citizens that value treating one another with respect and empathy. We developed the Campus Climate Committee (CCC) to include students, parents, and teachers to lead this project. The students developed activities to address areas of concern such as rumors, the isolation of bullied students, and being an upstander. We wanted to promote awareness among students and staff on the problems that occur when bullying is left unchecked, and how to proactively engage in intervening. Here are some recommended CCC activities: Vision Statement: We created a vision statement to serve as a guiding principle that points us toward our ideal for co-existing on our campus. Our vision statement is now posted in every classroom and throughout the school. It reads, “At Abbott Middle School, we value mutual respect, empathy, good choices, teamwork, and trust. We believe that a safe learning environment will promote success for everyone. WE ARE ABBOTT.”
Stand Up, Stand Out: No Checking, No Capping, No Bullying highlights one middle school's response to a noticeable increase in "checking," or the practice of exchanging verbal insults between students. This video highlights the next steps Fairview Middle School took in order to curb the practice of "checking," stop any opportunity to bully, and ultimately create a safer school for all students and community members.  To turn on closed captioning for this film, click play, then click the Subtitles/CC button on the bottom of the video player. Learn how to start a NIOS campaign at your school with our free Not In Our School Quick Start Guide. This video is part of the Not In Our School Video Action Kit, a comprehensive toolkit featuring films, lessons, and resources designed to motivate students to speak out against bullying, and create new ways to make their schools safe for everyone. Learn more about the Video Action Kit.  
Find previews and information about Class Actions at niot.org/ClassActions Written by: Julie Mann, Newcomers High School teacher, and Joe Lobozzo, Lakewood High School teacher I.    Role-playing:   Put students into groups of 3.  Give out the role-play scenarios. Explain to your students that they will be acting out these scenes. It is their job to create a positive ending, one in which the bullying is prevented.  Have each group perform the scenario and have the class analyze the scene to see what positive solution they created. Write down all the positive solutions on a poster as possible antidotes to bullying. Role-play scenarios: One student is making fun of another classmate’s looks. A student “accidentally” bumps into someone in the hall. A student is calling someone names because of the color of his/her skin. A student is teasing someone about the clothes he/she wears. A group of kids won't let you sit with them at lunch even though there's room. One student is joking with another by putting him/her down. II.    Anti-Bullying Poster Campaign: Have the same groups create anti-bullying posters.  Hang these posters in the hallway outside your classroom door and in other popular locations in the school.  
Find previews and information about Class Actions at niot.org/ClassActions Written by: Julie Mann, Newcomers High School teacher, and Joe Lobozzo, Lakewood High School teacher Vocabulary: BullyingSupport Upstander Bystander Guidance counsellor Questions: What strategies (name three) did this school district use to help end bullying? What personal stories did you hear? Did anything surprise you about these stories? What does the message “Not in our School” mean to you? What is the difference between peer power and peer pressure? How did the students help educate the teachers? Is this a good strategy? Why? What lessons can we learn from these strategies in our school? What risks do people in this part of the film take by acting? Why is it worth it for them to take those risks?  
Find previews and information about Class Actions at niot.org/ClassActions Written by: Julie Mann, Newcomers High School teacher, and Joe Lobozzo, Lakewood High School teacher Journal 1: Your friend is in an empty hallway (no teachers) being verbally attacked by some older, tougher students because of his different style of dress. What would you do? How would you feel? Why? (Pair/share when finished)
Created by Facing History and Ourselves   Overview   In this lesson idea, the short video “Cyberbullying” is explored through teaching strategies such as pre-viewing, anticipation guides, four corners, evaluating Internet resources, fishbowl and levels of questions. By learning about cyberbullying and how students in Watchung are taking a stand against online bullying, students may think more deeply about this in their own community.   This lesson is part of the Not In Our School Video Action Kit, a comprehensive toolkit featuring films, lessons, and resources designed to motivate students to speak out against bullying, and create new ways to make their schools safe for everyone.   Materials   Paper “Students Take On Cyberbullying” video Easel paper Markers Internet access to explore online resources on cyberbullying, as well as niot.org/nios   Suggested Activities    
 Created by Facing History and Ourselves Esta lección también está disponble en español.  Overview
 In this student-created video, people share their experiences of being excluded and encourages the acceptance of diversity.  Created by high school students from American University's Discover the World of Communication Summer Program held at University of California Berkeley during the Summer of 2011.
 This public service announcement encourages students to be an upstander. Created by high school students from American University's Discover the World of Communication Summer Program held at University of California Berkeley during the Summer of 2011.