Bullying | Not in Our Town

Bullying

It’s hard not to cry, or feel like you’ve been punched in the gut while watching the ten minutes of horrendous bullying and harassment that Upstate New York grandmother and school bus monitor was subjected to by a group of middle school students. 
  Standing opposite of the library at Grimmer Elementary School, the Kindness Tree mural serves as a reminder to all those who see it to cultivate kindness.   The fourth, fifth, and sixth graders at Grimmer Elementary School in Fremont, CA created the mural to represent the school and its diverse community. Collaborating with artist Brenda Pattee, the students designed the mural and chose the color scheme. Unique birds representing the students sit on the tree’s sprawling branches, surrounded by flowers with the word for “kindness” in different languages painted on them and banners written in English and Spanish. All the languages, including Farsi, Pashto, Portuguese, Laotian, Vietnamese, Urdu, Arabic, Tagalog, Chinese, and Hawaiian, come directly from the school’s community.
Tracy Maier attends an awards ceremony for daughter Hanna, as she receives the Upstander of the Week award from The Bully Project.  Tracy Maier is a Pennsylvania mom who moved into action after her child was bullied. She contacted Not In Our School to help not only her daughter, but all the children in her area who have been bullied and asked for help in getting things started in her community. Since that time, we have been in touch as both Tracy and her daughter Hanna have become leaders, taking risks, speaking with civic leaders, and organizing campaigns—all things that they never had done before. It is an example of how anyone can step up. Photos of Tracy and her daughter’s activities are featured in the Not In Our School Parent Guide. —Becki Cohn-Vargas, Not In Our School Director Tell us about your school community.
By Micaela Presti A child is not born a bully. It is a learned behavior and adults need to make sure they are role modeling for the children of our communities the importance of respect, tolerance and empathy. In the book, Nurture Shock by Po Bronson and Ashlee Merriman, there is a chapter on race and tolerance. The authors point out that white parents, in particular, feel that because their child may live in a community that is racially diverse, their children accept the differences. Parents then don’t feel they need to talk about differences. Nothing could be further from the truth. We need to talk about differences because children do notice that someone’s skin, sexual preference, etc. is different from theirs and they need to understand why.
There are important lessons on both bullying and speaking up that are happening right in front of our eyes. Recently, leading anti-bullying expert Emily Brazelton shared the results of the bullying investigation for the Miami Dolphins, after the pro football team’s bullying scandal. It serves as a case study to help everyone understand tackle Jonathan Martin’s courage to speak up and open his personal struggles to the world, which will help all of us learn the terrible impact of bullying, hate, racist and homophobic teasing. After reading the article, watch this new film “Auto Body Shop Owner Repairs Hearts After Hate Attack.” It features Quality Auto Paint & Body owner Richard Henegar, who hears that a local college student is the victim of an anti-gay hate attack and decides to help. Not only does Richard repair Jordan Addison's vandalized car, he brings his entire community together. Talk show host Ellen DeGeneres featured the two men on her 10th season premiere. Richard is also honored by his alma mater, Lord Botetourt High School who highlighted how one person can make a difference.
  By Dana Schuster We are all painfully aware that we live in a culture rife with judgment and bias, and a disturbing tendency to pit one group or viewpoint against another. While voices have recently been increasing in volume that say we must acknowledge and combat stigma and bullying, particularly among our youth, consider, if you will, the following scenarios.
  If you ever wondered what one person can do, meet Susan Guess. After her 8-year old daughter was bullied two years ago, she moved into action together with her daughter to raise awareness and get her whole community involved in anti-bullying activities.  
  Originally published on Edutopia By Dr. Becki Cohn-Vargas, Not In Our School Director
  During National Bullying Prevention Month we witnessed countless inspring stories of standing up. Here are two videos that feature the Not In Our School model on the Disney Channel and KPIX in San Francisco.   Disney Channel Showcases Student Upstanders   Now you can tune into the Disney Channel to see an anti-bullying campaign in action!   Students at Sunset Ridge Middle School in Utah covered their campus with Post-it notes that contained messages such as, “Not in our school” and “Stop hate together.” Disney Channel picked up on the activity and is now featuring it as part of their Make Your Mark campaign, reaching nearly 100 million homes in the U.S.        Bikers Against Bullying: Not In Our School in Oakland